OPINION

If the World Becomes Colour Blind...

March 11, 2009
Hardik Ruparel

As the day passes by, the spirit of Holi seems more and more distant from me. Even more distant than the sun itself. I can see the sun and I can feel it. But I really cannot feel the spirit of Holi today.

Maybe Liverpool thrashed Real Madrid, and India did the same to New Zealand, but still today seems so gloomy. The colors on my face just seem to be another symbol. And I hate symbolism. I hate it when we wear headgear as a display of symbolism. I wear a cap because I protect myself from the sun.

Nothing seems to alienate me from the thought (or fact ? ) that the world is spiraling downwards. My friends here in college play around with water and colors as they know nothing. But it's hard to believe they're so ignorant. It's becoming harder to find a reason to smile. It's so hard to believe the world has come to this.

The (so-called?) God we pray to has become the basis of hatred amongst each other. In the common room next to my room, some students do their Namaaz 5 times a day diligently. I don't understand what they're saying. It sounds beautiful. I stand in awe, listening hard, wishing I could understand them, their message, and tell the world how great they are. But then these students walk past the common room. They scoff and they laugh "Terrorists. "

I fail to believe what just happened. Have my ears defied me ? Should I trust my ears or should I trust the people ? I do not know. I fear to think what's the truth.

We haven't progressed much from the Dark Ages. We just don't execute and kill people the way they used to. We're not any more humane than they were. We're just some generations below them. Do we really think we're civilized enough ? We still think, imagine, in our hearts, how we could punish people that we don't like. We hate to admit it. But it's true.

It's true and the world has only gotten worse. Technology has done it's part. Before we could love each other and eradicate diseases like communal hatred, we've found myriad ways to destroy each other.

On such complicated days, nothing seems to cheer me up. Not even good jokes. They only bring a smile. Or probably two. I go back to my magic, and my deck of cards refuse to vanish like they should when I wave my hands ( I don't yet have a magic wand...)

I look around and see how colors have made a difference in the world. Skin colors from white to brown to black to yellow. The colors of things around us influence us. Thanks to The Discovery Channel, I know that colors play a major part in our personality, society, development and hence communalism : Orange, Green, Yellow, Blue and the Red.

That brings me to imagine a day we all woke up to be colorblind. Would we still discriminate against each other ? On religion, color, race, sex, minorities, political parties and other interests ? What if all our lives lost color ? Would we be distressed enough to forget our differences ? Or would we get further enraged and kill each other with nuke bombs ? Would we realize that color actually had no importance and meaning in our lives ? Would the European countries be able to distinguish one flag from the other ? Or would we use our memory to record which object was of which color and continue living pretending that we still saw colors ?

Pretense has been one of the most important factors for survival in this world. I'm sure someone would've said this :

"Shit happens. Just pretend it didn't and get on with life."

If nobody has said it before, well it was just too general and accepted a fact to be even stated explicitly.

Today literally has no significance to today. All we can do is go back to our lives and look at the simple things in life. That brings me to the age old question asked by so many wise men and women:

"Why are we here?"

And I say we are here to enjoy the simple things in life that delight us. For me it's chocolate. Chocolate has helped me resolve many a strife, and many internal disturbances. Chocolate is one of the biggest motivation factors for me. I'm off for a bar of Cadbury's. Happy Holi.

Hardik Ruparel is a 20 yr. old B.Tech(Computer Science) pre-final year student from NIT Trichy. He takes avid interest in national and political matters, the English Premier League and close-up magic, apart from keeping track of the latest in technology. He's been interested in writing articles/poems since childhood. When not in class, he's usually performing magic for friends or playing the guitar.
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#1
temporal
URL
March 11, 2009
11:08 AM

That brings me to imagine a day we all woke up to be colorblind.

having strong undercurrents of the animal in us i suppose we would fight over shades of gray

#2
kaffir
March 11, 2009
11:27 AM

"And I hate symbolism. I hate it when we wear headgear as a display of symbolism. I wear a cap because I protect myself from the sun."

==

So how did you go about buying that cap you wear that protects you from the sun? Did you go for a famous name (Nike? Adidas? US Sports team alphabets/name emblazoned on the front?) or buy the first cap that you came across, "color-blind" to its color and make/label?

It's very tempting to throw the baby out with the bathwater, but good luck on your journey. :)

#3
Hardik
March 11, 2009
01:09 PM

@kaffir
Oh yes I did buy the first cap I found in the market. A Chinese one.. My cap says "lining". Whatever that means :)
I'm usually not a fan of marketing stuff for the corporations. Why should I pay for the thing I buy and market it myself..

#4
Kerty
March 11, 2009
01:33 PM

Life is what you make it out to be. There will always be good, bad and ugly, always has been, but that is no reason to appreciate the beauty of life and this world. Clutching it in a fist and never giving it up may hurt the knuckles, and releasing the fist may relieve that pain, but it will leave you empty handed. So hold on to what is dear and beautiful, even if it is painful to hold on to. That is what Holi is all about. Celebrating the colors of life, appreciating the beauty of goodness. If you close your eyes, there are no more colors. But it would also leave you with eternal darkness - and you can't create rainbow out of darkness.

#5
Ruvy
URL
March 11, 2009
07:01 PM

I say we are here to enjoy the simple things in life that delight us. For me it's chocolate. Chocolate has helped me resolve many a strife, and many internal disturbances. Chocolate is one of the biggest motivation factors for me. I'm off for a bar of Cadbury's.

I'm with you. We just finished celebrating Purim, a holiday that commemorates the salvation of the Jews of Persia from the plot of an ancient enemy to kill us all off. As part of the celebrations, we give each other gifts; my wife made loads of chocolate cakes to give to our neighbors and we got chocolate in turn.

Like you, I feel no reasons to celebrate; today's Persians are howling for our destruction, some idiot in Mecca is demanding that the Starbuck's there be closed because it "uses the crown of Xerxes on the head of Queen Esther" (the Jewish queen who is the hero of Purim) as its logo. The North American campuses have just finished defaming our country with "Israel Apartheid Week" and the new government here is already getting the feces of the Americans all over their lips before even handing out all the cabinet portfolios.

This is no reason to celebrate salvation or be joyful, as our sages command us. So, forced by my work to sit in front of this computer for another two hours, I've just indulged myself in a chocolate bar. Nor Cadbury's but something nearly as good.... I don't do it often, and already I am feeling the reactions (coughing fits), but chocolate is a motivating factor for me too.

So, I'm with you.

#6
temporal
URL
March 11, 2009
08:00 PM

no chocolates for guessing why;)

"I couldn't run. My pregnancy was too far advanced and there was nowhere to hide," said Amna Salman Rabaye, 31, as she recalled the terrifying incident several months ago.

Rabaye from the Palestinian Bedouin village of al-Tuwani in the southern West Bank was grazing her sheep when she was assaulted by a security guard from the adjacent illegal Israeli settlement of Ma'on.

"We saw a group of masked Israeli settlers armed with sticks and chains heading towards us. The younger shepherds ran and managed to escape, leaving me with the flock of sheep," Rabaye told IPS.

"It was physically impossible for me to run and I also didn't want the settlers to kill or steal my sheep. The security guard pushed me over but I was not injured," recalled Rabaye who was then seven months pregnant. Mel Frykberg

#7
Ruvy
URL
March 11, 2009
08:50 PM

Hardik,

[yawn]

I forgot to mention that at this site, there are always folks ready to drag out the lies of Arab propagandists and display them as if they were truth.

I'm going to go rummage the fridge for another chocolate bar, if you'll excuse me....

#8
temporal
URL
March 11, 2009
08:56 PM
#9
kaffir
March 12, 2009
05:38 PM

"In the common room next to my room, some students do their Namaaz 5 times a day diligently. I don't understand what they're saying. It sounds beautiful. I stand in awe, listening hard, wishing I could understand them, their message, and tell the world how great they are."
******************
If you don't understand what they're saying, and if you don't understand them or their message, how do arrive at the conclusion that "how great they are"? I hope you see the logical fallacy of your statements. For someone who is in engineering, logic should be a strength.

As to what they say, plenty of things about infidels and idol-worshipers, and how Muslims are "superior" to rest all non-Muslims. A simple google search would bring up information on that.

But the way your mind is working, it's not making a decision based on actual evaluation, but reacting to your fellow students' scornful statements as you seek to "right" the balance in this world through your response by aligning with the "underdog/victim", a balance which in your view, has been unbalanced by those comments.




A note to the editors: Was this dour post the only one submitted to celebrate the colorful and joyous festival of Holi? No Holi contest, a la Valentine's Day contest?

#10
commonsense
March 12, 2009
06:06 PM

Kaffir:

"As to what they say, plenty of things about infidels and idol-worshipers, and how Muslims are "superior" to rest all non-Muslims."

trust "Kaffir" to say such things...

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